Mimicing the attributes of real-world suspension

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tfaith08
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Mimicing the attributes of real-world suspension

Postby tfaith08 » Fri May 22, 2015 12:14 pm

I've put a good bit of time into actually designing suspension and trying to focus on leverage ratios, rising rates, and variable rates, as well as how they pertain to balance, control, and bottom-out resistance. Applying my experience from racing is somewhat of a challenge since there is only one adjustment that I'm used to seeing (preload, or hardness as it's called in this game), whereas the max-compression setting is more of a nice virtual possibility. To really make a stand-out suspension setup, one would really need to be able to control high and low speed compression, compression progression, rebound, and multiple spring rates, but that's a little much to ask at this point in the game series. (Maybe I can demand some more once I contribute on indigogo...lol) More than anything, it really puts a new perspective on suspension design and application.

I guess what I'm really trying to get at here is that I'd like to see what else other people have done to create and test long-travel suspension setups on here - to get some information flowing and potentially teach some newer guys and younger guys about suspension theory and practice (well, you know what I mean).

Feel free to check any of my cars out, give feedback, ask questions, tell me they suck, whatever. Most of what I've posted is a progression of how I approach suspension or is made specifically for a track. Some are pre-point-setting version cars, so keep that in mind as well.

Let's see what else is out there from the guys who know suspension!
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Xgage1
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Re: Mimicing the attributes of real-world suspension

Postby Xgage1 » Sun May 24, 2015 12:01 am

I ride Motor-Cycles so I have a a fair amount of knowledge about suspension. In this game its pretty limited in what you can do (as you have speculated). I have tried different physical suspension setups, like pro-link, but due to the fact that the frame material is flexible, having a complex suspension setup just results in a bouncy ride.

For those who don't know, Pro-Link is a system that changes the mechanical relationship(leverage n stuff) between the swing-arm and shock(spring) in order to make the suspension stiffer as the swing arm travels up. You ask how? Basically as the swing arm goes up, the shock actually compresses at a faster rate. Look up a diagram lol :D

I think RoKo0 should make a new part that is stiffer/stronger, can be shorter, costs more, and is heavier. This will still force people to make strong frames in a strategic way (because that's a main element in the game), and it will allow more intricate, creative designs.
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tfaith08
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Re: Mimicing the attributes of real-world suspension

Postby tfaith08 » Mon May 25, 2015 1:44 am

Both I and Xgage1 can. Double wishbone (I'll refer to that as A-arm) setups are good if you're manipulating leverage ratios, but it's largely useless in this game. I've found a few places where I could work in a way to use it, but nowhere where it was actually beneficial. I never actually use any of them.

That goes back to the point of the thread. Even if you could, anything other than a 1:1 ratio is going to give you some trouble, especially rising rates. If you implement a 1:1 LR into an a-arm setup, you may as well save the parts and run a single bar.
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tfaith08
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Re: Mimicing the attributes of real-world suspension

Postby tfaith08 » Mon May 25, 2015 1:48 am

Touching on the topic of adding a new part, I think there should be some additional realism added, but not too much. More suspension tuning and a more demand on chassis geometry while also allowing the minimum length on parts to go away. Those 3 combined would be game changers.
OP was drunk. All is forgiven.

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danieldorais
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Re: Mimicing the attributes of real-world suspension

Postby danieldorais » Mon May 25, 2015 6:53 pm

I made a car with a lot of suspension travel. It does not really replicate a real world suspension but I think it has great potential in the game.
car_picture1.jpg
car_picture1.jpg (12.82 KiB) Viewed 7253 times

http://dreamcarracing.com/dcr3-index.html?carid=58230
The problem is I'm not very good at adjusting the hardness. Could anyone try to optimize the hardness? Also, the horizontal shock does not necessarily need to be there.
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Xgage1
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Re: Mimicing the attributes of real-world suspension

Postby Xgage1 » Tue May 26, 2015 12:47 am

One downfall of these (wonderful) suspension setups is greater un-sprung weight. Less unsprung weight means the tires can follow the terrain better, and it also means bumps have less of an impact on car position. So the lighter the better.
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danieldorais
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Re: Mimicing the attributes of real-world suspension

Postby danieldorais » Tue May 26, 2015 5:00 am

Xgage1 wrote:One downfall of these (wonderful) suspension setups is greater un-sprung weight. Less unsprung weight means the tires can follow the terrain better, and it also means bumps have less of an impact on car position. So the lighter the better.

I think the minimum hardness is actually too hard for light cars. It needs a larger range of adjustability.
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tfaith08
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Re: Mimicing the attributes of real-world suspension

Postby tfaith08 » Wed Jun 24, 2015 6:08 pm

The rear design is somewhat excessive for what it offers. The wheel has some lateral play due to the springs as well, and that can become an issue in technical spots.

I'm afraid the front is gonna give you trouble either way you look at it. There simply isn't enough support for it to work properly, nor is there sufficient travel. If you increase the rake to soak up lateral hits, it makes the front hop horrible.

The longer the arms (to an extent), the better from what I've seen. An arm that is 2/3-3/4 the length of the body makes for pretty good dynamics and is easier to control.
OP was drunk. All is forgiven.


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